The Wesser Mission and Vision Workshop

On the 14th September employees from all departments at Wesser UK got together to take part in our first ever Mission and Vision workshop. A day dedicated to identifying what drives us as a business and what makes Wesser a great place to work.

Human Resources Administrator Michelle Amos, wrote a brief overview of the day especially for the Wesser Blog:

I was invited to attend the company Mission & Vision Workshop on Thursday 14th September where we were tasked with creating a vision and mission that reflects the important work we do at Wesser. I think the fact that employees were invited, is testament to what a great company we work for, and shows that Martin Wesser really values our input. The workshop was run by Piers Fallowfield–Cooper, an executive coach and mentor who has coached and developed high performing executives from all over the world. Piers had asked us to prepare for the workshop by considering a few questions; who were 2 leaders we respected? If we could be any historical, mythological or movie character who would we be? And what companies we like, respect or do business with? As Piers predicted, this provoked a lot of discussion in the office; some people knew their answers straight away, but most of struggled and had to really think about it, which then prompted many of us to ask ourselves why we didn’t know who we respect and why! I think we all got there eventually, all with very different but very interesting answers.

On the day, to start off with, we talked about some of the leaders that people respected and the reasons why. It was apparent that the traits of these leaders were similar in the sense that they had a clear view of their direction and the direction of their companies or organisations. We talked about the companies that people respect or like to do business with. Again the reasons why were along the same lines. We then looked at some different companies including John Lewis and Apple with mission and vision statements that stand out from the crowd. Piers talked to us about the Why, How and What. What we do and how we do it as a company is straightforward, but working out why can sometimes be the hardest part. So we split into our smaller groups for the day and started working this out. Most groups thought about words that they connected with Wesser. Some of the words that came up numerous times were; family, integrity, ethical, welcoming, the best, morals and unique which are all excellent terms for employees to identify with Wesser.

After lunch, in our groups we started working on putting our vision and mission together. This was very challenging; however, when each group presented their ideas, there were some really impressive results.

Although we did not create a final Vision and Mission during the workshop, together we have made a great start, from which we will create an inspiring and memorable vision for the business. Thank you to Martin for inviting us to be part of it.

 

 

 

 

 

Article by Michelle Amos – Human Resources Administrator

A Day With St John Ambulance at Cheltenham Festival

I’m a big sports fan… massive. I generally would be happy to watch any sports. Football and boxing have got to be my two favorite but when it comes to atmosphere and excitement, horse racing really gives these two a run for their money (pun intended).

So imagine my delight when St John Ambulance (SJA) kindly invited someone from the Wesser team to observe the final day of the Cheltenham Festival! I was dead chuffed and set about deciding which scarf to wear with my carefully put together Cheltenham attire. I arrived bright and early to the racecourse. It’s very different at that time in the morning, with the bright sun falling across the grounds and a small buzz of people arranging the final bits for the final day. I was greeted by Kevin Dickens – a Community Fundraising Coordinator, who is my main liaison with the charity in South West England – and he introduced me to Beth, an advanced First Aider who was happy to answer my hundreds of questions.

The main base where I met them was actually rebuilt not so long ago; when it was, SJA volunteers were consulted on how it should be built to such a degree the building entrance was moved 90 degrees for easier access. In this main treatment centre you would find four beds, two doctors, some nurses, a handful of paramedics, advanced first aiders and the emergency transport guys. The ambulance crew is also based out of this centre and it’s all to look after the public and staff (jockeys have a separate private treatment centre). Rick Dean, a nurse, was one of the main people to influence this and he explained that the treatment centre could treat pretty much anything except for a major trauma.

Top of the agenda of the day was the morning briefing which I felt privileged to listen in on. Straight up, you notice how jovial everyone is (considering over the next 12 hours they will be giving first aid and, possibly, saving lives). It’s good humored and jokes were in abundance. What also struck me was the ages of the volunteers, with maybe a 50 year spread from youngest to oldest. As well as the enjoyment the guys obviously get from what they do, their instructions are clear. What amazed me the most was the code words used for preparation for evacuation and if an evacuation is cancelled. I of course cannot give this confidential information away but it was interesting to see what goes on behind the scenes of one of the country’s biggest sporting events.

Other privileged highlights were seeing the control centre with its banks of computers monitoring each and every face coming into the grounds. The control centre has police, ambulance, fire and three different security firms – not forgetting the mighty SJA! Also seeing what is the busiest helipad in Europe over those four days is also quite something; you actually see a mechanical bird landing every five minutes to drop off another celebrity!

The SJA Cycle Response Units have everything a normal ambulance has but on a bike! These guys impress me no end, being as fit as I could only dream of. Riding a bike with flashing lights and all the equipment to save a life.

Overall, what struck me the most though was the amount of hours given up over the four days of the Cheltenham Festival; 42 volunteers each day, giving up to 10 hours a day. That’s over 2,000 hours given up without even thinking about the preparation hours and the meetings afterwards. It’s a huge event for SJA but they handle it with the same great attitude and professionalism as any other events. These green jacketed men and women truly are heroes – on call and ready for anything from heart attacks and broken bones to infected corns and people who have drunk one to many glasses of champagne!

If I had won some money too, it would have been a perfect day, but I will settle for truly inspirational one.

 

Article by James Dennis – Snr Fundraising Campaign Coach

Why do I do this job?

So the question of the day……

Why do I do this Job?

I think it’s a question that’s asked of many in any line of work; for some it’s money, for some it’s a passion, for others it’s a belief in doing the right thing, for me it’s a combination.

I did my own first aid training at the age of 6 as it was a necessary part of me growing up with family that had disabilities and were at times in need of those skills. So, for me I have a true belief that every child should have the knowledge to save a life.

St John Ambulance are the very reason I am still alive today.  I never thought I’d be in need of first aid but nothing brings your life into more focus than nearly losing it. At the age of 22 I had the idea of getting fit and decided bike riding was the way to go, I lived in beautiful coastal North Wales so scenic routes to work and getting fit bonus. But, one serendipitous morning in April my life nearly came to an abrupt halt when my heart decided well for want of a better expression it didn’t like me very much. I count my stars everyday that those lads drove out of the depot early that day because it they hadn’t I would not be here today. If it wasn’t for the training St John provides in the workplace the man that saved my life would not have been able to do so, the St John paramedic that took me to hospital much to my disgruntled displeasure as I wanted to go to work would not have been called and the last 10 years of my life would not have happened.

For the last 2 years I’ve been a fundraiser and developed into a team leader. I’ve put my skills to use in life changing situations. I’ve provided training to others and I’d like to think I’ve saved lives. Yes I’ve raised money for an amazing charity but for several reasons: 1) It’s the right thing to do. 2) I truly believe in the cause and what we accomplish on a daily basis and 3) probably most importantly for me, without people like us St John would not be able to continue to save lives.

So why do I do this Job?  Because I’m a product of the skills, determination and necessity that is First Aid.

Everyone has a reason for things they do in life and what they let influence their paths in life. What will your legacy be?

Article by: Gill Murnane – Wesser St John Cymru Wales – Team Leader